House Cornelii

History

Cornelius (fem. Cornelia, masc. plural Cornelii) was the nomen of the patrician gens Cornelia (or Cornelia gens), one of the most important gentes, or families, of Ancient Rome. The origins of the family, or clan, are unknown; however, the nomina of the clans, which are names of noble individuals of only one name, date to the Roman kingdom. The monarch, Servius Tullius, is said to have utilized the services of the priest of Diana, Cornelius, in acquiring and sacrificing to the Roman people a cow of prodigious horns (cornua), which long stood in the temple of the godess.

The first known consulship of any Cornelius was that of Servius Cornelius who served with Quintus Fabius in 485 BC, only twenty-five years after the founding of the republic. In that year the trial of the former consul, Spurius Cassius, for treason for his proposed land distribution laws during his consulship and subsequent execution of the man and pulling down of his house affirmed the expectations and limits for consuls.

The clan maintained its position as important contributor to the highest offices of the republic, and began to contest for consulships with the Fabii and the Valerii from the 3rd century BC. Over thirty percent of all consulships were held by men from this gens; several great commanders also came from this prominent family.

Current Events

House Cornelii openly supports House Brutiii without supporting Marcus Brutus. Many expect Gaius Julius Caesar to eventually move against this house and House Brutii.

House Cornelii is rumored to have the favor of the goddess Diana and many magi at their service, and few wish to risk a shadow war against their magical might.

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