Venus

Venus is a major Roman goddess principally associated with love, beauty and fertility, who played a key role in many Roman religious festivals and myths. From the third century BC, the increasing Hellenization of Roman upper classes identified her as the equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. In this way Venus was the consort of Vulcan. Virgil, in compliment to his patron Augustus and the gens Julia made Venus, whom Julius Caesar adopted as his protectress, the ancestor of the Roman people by way of its legendary founder Aeneas and his son Iulus.

Venus was commonly associated with the Greek goddess Aphrodite and the Etruscan deity Turan, borrowing aspects from each. As with most other gods and goddesses in Roman mythology, the literary concept of Venus is mantled in whole-cloth borrowings from the literary Greek mythology of her equivalent counterpart, Aphrodite. The early, Etruscan or Latin goddess of vegetation and gardens became deliberately associated with the Greek Goddess Aphrodite.[1] In some Latin mythology Eros was the son of Venus and Mars, the god of war.

Cult

Her cult began in Ardea and Lavinium, Latium. On August 15, 293 BC, her oldest-known temple was dedicated, and August 18 became a festival called the Vinalia Rustica. On April 25, 215 BC, a temple to Venus was dedicated outside the Colline gate on the Capitoline Hill, to commemorate the Roman defeat at the Battle of Lake Trasimene.

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License